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10 Foods with More Sugar Than You Think

Oct 19, 2018

By: Christine Bermudez

Life Style

Sugar can give you a heartache. No, I am not talking about your honey or sugar. Sugar intake should be managed properly to avoid a multitude of health problems. According to WHO, sugar-loaded foods can lead to obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

What sugar do you have to look out for? High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS).

HFCS is a combination of fructose and glucose liquid sweetener made from corn starch. Too much intake of HFCS might lead to lasting and harmful diseases. Here are 10 popular foods you've been eating with more sugar than you think:

Salad Dressing
Salad dressings like Ranch, Italian, French, Russian, and Thousand Island are loaded with HFCS. Those advertised as low-calorie and fat-free have added sugar or HFCS to compensate for the flavor removed along with the fat. Healthline says that one tablespoon of fat-free French dressing contains three grams of sugar.

Sauces
True, ketchup and barbecue sauce adds flavour and texture to your meal, but many of these products have HCFS listed as the first ingredient. A tablespoon of ketchup has three grams of sugar, while two tablespoons of barbecue sauce contain 11 grams. Choose the brand with the least amount of sugar when you go grocery shopping next time.

Fruit Juices
Juice is already naturally high in sugar due to its source of fruit, but some producers sweeten it further with HFCS. Take caution on the sweet stuff you're drinking out of a bottle or carton bought from the store because most of them have the same amount of sugar added to soda.

Sports Drinks
An energy drink might be tempting after a workout or energy slump, but doubt not because it has more sugar content than you think. Energy and sports drinks are rich in HFCS that will give you more harm than good. Choose water instead -- it's a much healthier beverage.

Granola Bars
AA lot of protein and "nutrition" bars contain a dose of HFCS. Myfooddata mentions that energy and cereal bars have 10.9 grams of fructose. The amount of added sugar in most granola bars are similar to those in some candy bars. It's time to rethink these meal replacements. Choose a nutty bar that's lower in sugar and full of healthy nuts instead.

Digestive Biscuits
It's always a must to double check ingredients on your items. More often than not, your digestive biscuits and other crackers have added HFCS. Opt for healthier brands available, or whole foods that make a healthier choice.

Instant Foods
In the advent of fast food and overly processed foods, it's pretty convenient to heat up or just add water for a meal. Frozen meals are made to last for a very long time, and sugar acts as a preservative. The flavoured instant packets in most cup noodles have a high dose of HFCS hiding in them.

Fat-Free Foods
Low-fat foods and fat-free foods might seem healthy for those trying to lose weight or improving their diet, but they're most likely filled with sugar and other additives not good for you. Take a look into the ingredients section, sugar will be on the first three.

Fruit Flavored Yogurt
Yes, it is often a healthy snack. If you choose the right one. Even those labelled "low-calorie," "natural" or "organic" can contain HFCS as a sweetener. Get a plain yogurt next time, and flavour it yourself with berries or fruits.

Frozen Yogurt
Be it low-fat or non-fat frozen yogurt, it still contains just as much sugar as ice cream. Healthline lists 100 grams of non-fat froyo with 24 grams of sugar, while a similar serving of ice cream only has 21 grams.

How can you avoid eating HFCS?
1. Prepare your own food as much as possible.
2. Read food labels. Put down those items high in sugar.
3. HFCS is also called: glucose syrup, maize syrup, corn syrup, crystalline fructose and corn sugar

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