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Neurodiagnostic Center

World Citi Med's new specialized facility, the Neurodiagnostic Center is now ready to serve its communities. It is a comprehensive care destination for neurology patients for pediatrics and adult, for both outpatients and inpatients. It is designed to have physical and emotional support environment. With highly competent neurologists and technicians on staff, our Neurodiagnostic Center offers services to assist area physicians in diagnosing and treating a variety of conditions of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and peripheral nervous system (muscles and nerve). This includes diagnosis of epilepsy, stroke and other neurological conditions including congenital malformations. The immediate and excellent image of the results assists your physicians for better diagnosis and treatment.

SERVICES

  • Electroencephalogram (EEG)
  • Carotid Doppler Ultrasound
  • Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound
  • Cranial Ultrasound/ Head Ultrasound
  • Muscle Ultrasound
  • Spinal Ultrasound

ABOUT THE PROCEDURES

ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM (EEG)

What is an EEG?

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test that measures and records the electrical activity of your brain. Special sensors called electrodes are attached to your head. They're hooked by wires to a computer. The computer records your brain's electrical activity on the screen. Or it may record the activity on paper as wavy lines. Changes from the normal pattern of electrical activity can show certain conditions, such as seizures.

What are some common uses of the procedure?

An electroencephalogram (EEG) may be done to:
  • Diagnose epilepsy and determine what types of seizures are occurring. EEG is the most useful and important test in confirming a diagnosis of epilepsy.
  • Identify the location of a suspected brain tumor, inflammation, infection (such as encephalitis or meningitis), bleeding, head injury, or disease in the brain, such as Parkinson's disease.
  • Evaluate periods of unconsciousness or dementia.
  • Help predict a person's chance of recovery after a change in consciousness.
  • Confirm or rule out brain death in a person who is in a coma.
  • Studies sleep disorders, such as narcolepsy.
  • Monitor brain activity while a person is receiving general anesthesia during surgery

What are the preparations needed for EEG?

  • Wash patient’s hair the night before or the day of the test, but don't use any conditioners, hair creams, sprays or styling gels. Hair products can make it harder for the sticky patches that hold the electrodes to adhere to the patient’s scalp.
  • Have a good meal prior to the scheduled time.
  • Don’t let the patient sleep during travelling time until you are called by the technician in-charge.
  • Avoid anything with caffeine on the day of the test, because caffeine can affect the test results.
  • Take your usual medications unless instructed otherwise.
  • For infant, please bring extra milk formula/food.
If you're supposed to sleep during your EEG test, your doctor may ask you to sleep less or even avoid sleep entirely the night before your EEG.

CRANIAL OR HEAD ULTRASOUND

What is a Cranial or Head Ultrasound?

A cranial or head ultrasound is a safe and painless test that uses sound waves to make images of the brain. Babies whose skulls have not yet fully developed - that is - they still have their soft spots on their head called fontanels can safely undergo this procedure. The soft spot makes it possible for the ultrasound waves to penetrate and reach the brain.

WHY DO DOCTORS ORDER A CRANIAL OR HEAD ULTRASOUND OF THE PEDIATRIC BRAIN?

  • Neurological problems like birth asphyxia, neonatal seizures, intracranial hemorrhage, neural tube defects, brain malformation, cerebrovascular malformations, abnormally low muscle tone, Arthrogryposis (permanent shortening of joints), congenital neuromuscular diseases, infections of the nervous system, hydrocephalus, and neurologic impairment that requires newborns to be ventilator-dependent.
  • Complications of prematurity e.g. bleeding in the brain tissue or ventricles or injury to the white matter of the brain surrounding the ventricles.
  • Abnormal head size or bulges in the fontanel or the soft portion of the baby’s head.
  • Hydrocephalus.
  • Tumor.
  • Complications from meningitis.
  • Cyst

WHAT DO DOCTORS SAY TO THE PARENT/S OF THE BABY TO PREPARE FOR IT?

  • Inform the technician about any medications being administered to the baby for the purpose of disclosure.
  • Stay by your baby’s side providing comfort and reassurance; you can also feed your baby during the ultrasound.

WILL THE ULTRASOUND HURT?

The gel may feel slightly cold and wet and the baby may feel a slight pressure on the soft spot on his/her head but will not feel pain.

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE?

The entire process takes 15-30 minutes and involves an ultrasound machine, a selection of transducers effective for a neonatal brain ultrasound examination, an examination table, positioning aids like pillows, a chair, acoustic gel and gel warmers, antibacterial wipes or solution, examination gloves, bed linen and towels, and a sonographer’s worksheet.

WHEN WILL THE RESULT BECOME AVAILABLE?

1-2 days but can be released immediately in emergency cases like an abnormal test result.

Compiled using information from the following sources:

TRANSCRANIAL DOPPLER

What is a Transcranial Doppler?

A transcranial doppler ultrasound evaluates both the direction and velocity of the blood flow in the major cerebral arteries of the brain as well as asses the risk of stroke in adults and children. It is the test of choice for: A transcranial doppler ultrasound evaluates both the direction and velocity of the blood flow in the major cerebral arteries of the brain as well as asses the risk of stroke in adults and children. It is the test of ch
  • Addressing critical and life-threatening neurological complications following a ruptured brain aneurysm.
  • Blockage of blood vessels.
  • Blood clots in the blood vessels.
  • Hole in the upper chamber of the heart.

WHY DOCTORS ORDER A TRANSCRANIAL DOPPLER ULTRASOUND?

  • To detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, and vessels.
  • To detect abnormal masses, such as tumors.

WHAT DO DOCTORS SAY TO THEIR PATIENTS TO PREPARE FOR IT?

  • Remove prescription or color contact lenses.
  • This cannot be performed on patients who have just had cataract and laser eye surgery. Patients will be advised to wait for one month prior to undergoing the test.

WILL THE ULTRASOUND HURT?

No. Though pulse-like sounds that change in pitch as the blood flow is monitored and measured may be distracting to the patient. HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE? The entire test lasts at least 45 minutes. During the procedure, the patient lies on a gurney. The technician applies a small amount of gel at the temples, over the closed eyelids, under the jaw and at the base of

WHEN WILL THE RESULT BECOME AVAILABLE?

1-2 days but can be released immediately in emergency cases like an abnormal test result.

Compiled using information from the following sources:

MUSCLE ULTRASOUND

What is Muscle or Musculoskeletal Ultrasound?

Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures of muscles, tendons, ligaments and joints throughout the body. It is used to help diagnose muscle dystrophy , neuropathy and other soft tissue conditions.

What are some common uses of the procedure?

Ultrasound images are typically used to help diagnose:
  • Tendon tears, or tendinitis of the rotator cuff in the shoulder, Achilles tendon in the ankle and other tendons throughout the body.
  • Muscle tears, masses or fluid collections.
  • Ligament sprains or tears.
  • Inflammation or fluid (effusions) within the bursae and joints.
  • Early changes of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Nerve entrapments such as carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Benign and malignant soft tissue tumors.
  • Ganglion cysts.
  • Hernias.
  • Foreign bodies in the soft tissues (such as splinters or glass).
  • Dislocations of the hip in infants.
  • Fluid in a painful hip joint in children.
  • Neck muscle abnormalities in infants with torticollis (neck twisting).
  • Soft tissue masses (lumps/bumps) in children.

SPINAL ULTRASOUND

What is Spinal Ultrasound?

Spinal ultrasound is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique used to evaluate individuals for possible defects of the spinal column or spinal cord.

What are some common uses of the procedure?

Ultrasound of the spine and para-spinal tissues medically necessary in newborns and infants for the following indications:
  • Detection of sequelae of injury (e.g., hematoma after spinal tap or birth injury; post-traumatic leakage of cerebrospinal fluid; and sequelae of prior instrumentation, infection, or hemorrhage).
  • Evaluation of suspected defects such as cord tethering, diastematomyelia, hydromyelia, and syringomyelia.
  • Guidance for lumbar puncture.
  • Lumbosacral stigmata known to be associated with spinal dysraphism.
  • Post-operative assessment for cord retethering.
  • Spectrum of caudal regression syndrome (e.g., anal atresia or stenosis; sacral agenesis).
  • Visualization of fluid with characteristics of blood products within the spinal canal in neonates and infants with intra-cranial hemorrhage.

Doctors

De Guzman, Ma. Cecilia E. M.D. Room 219 Loc. 219
Neuro-Psychiatrist 06:00 PM – 08:00 PM
Mon-Wed-Fri
Diaz, Joselito B. M.D. Room 203 Loc. 203
Neuro-Psychiatrist 02:00 PM – 05:00 PM
Tue & Wed
Gonzales, Ma. Carmencita B. M.D. Room 219 Loc. 219
Neuro-Psychiatrist
Tue-Wed-Thu 04:00 PM – 06:00 PM
Friday 10:00 AM – 12:00 NN
Saturday 03:00 PM – 05:00 PM

Visit Us

Location : Ground Floor
Trunk Line : 438-45-80 loc. 172
Direct Line : 462-90-11
Office Hours : 8:00am-5:00pm (Mon - Sat)